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DonorCare@HSA >> Health Assessment Questionnaire

DONOR HEALTH ASSESSMENT QUESTIONNAIRE

 
To find out the answers to these questions below you may move your mouse over and click on each question.
 

*1(a)

Is your purpose for this donation visit to find out whether or not you are infected with HIV or suffering from AIDS?
 

Yes

No

*1(b)

There is a window period in the early stage of HIV infection where you may test negative for the virus and you may feel well. Do you know that during this window period you can transmit the virus to someone else?
 

Yes

No

*1(c)

Is there any reason for you to suspect that you have or could possibly have been infected with HIV or AIDS?
 

Yes

No

*1(d)

Have you ever offered to anyone sexual activity* services for cash or benefits of any kind?
 

Yes

No

*2(a)

Male Donors: have you ever engaged in sexual activity* with another male?
 

Yes

No

*2(b)

Female Donors: in the past twelve (12) months, have you engaged in sexual activity* with a male whom you know or suspect to have engaged in sexual activity* with another male?
 

Yes

No

*3(a)

In the past twelve (12) months, have you had: unexplained weight loss or persistent night sweats, fever, diarrhoea or swollen glands?
 

Yes

No

*3(b)

In the last twelve (12) months, have you engaged in sexual activity* with anyone you know or have reason to suspect is infected with HIV or AIDS?
 

Yes

No

*4

In the last twelve (12) months, have you:
 

Yes

No

*(a)

received from anyone sexual activity* services for cash or benefits of any kind?
 

Yes

No

*(b)

engaged in sexual activity* with anyone whom you have known for less than six (6) months?
 

Yes

No

*(c)

engaged in sexual activity* with more than one partner?
 

Yes

No

*(d)

had been treated for syphilis, gonorrhea or any other sexually transmitted disease or had a positive test for syphilis?
 

Yes

No

*(e)

engaged in sexual activity* with a person described as in paragraphs 4(a), (b), (c) or (d)? *"sexual activity" means:- (a) sexual activity occasioned by the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; or (b) cunnilingus.
 

Yes

No

*5

Have you:
 

Yes

No

*(a)

donated blood, double unit red cells, platelets or plasma in the last 16 weeks?
 

Yes

No

*(b)

ever been told to stop giving blood or been refused as a blood donor?
 

Yes

No

*(c)

ever had yellow jaundice or hepatitis or a positive hepatitis test?
 

Yes

No

*(d)

been in close physical proximity with anyone with yellow jaundice or hepatitis or a positive hepatitis test in the past twelve (12) months?
 

Yes

No

*(e)

ever received blood transfusion in UK, Mexico, France, South America and Central America or received plasma derived product in any country (including Singapore)?
 

Yes

No

*(f)

received a blood transfusion in any other countries (other than the UK, Mexico, France, South America or Central America) in the last 12 months?
 

Yes

No

*(g)

ever taken or been injected with addictive drugs?
 

Yes

No

*(h)

within the past twelve (12) months, ever had body piercing (including ear piercing), tattoos, acupuncture done or been accidentally exposed to someone else's blood (including blood contaminated instrument)?
 

Yes

No

*(i)

been detained or remanded in prison, approved institutions, approved homes or detention centers / barracks in the past twelve (12) months?
 

Yes

No

6(a)

Are you feeling well today?
 

Yes

No

6(b)

Do you have any fever today or during the past 3 weeks?
 

Yes

No

7

In the past twelve (12) months, have you:
 

Yes

No

(a)

been hospitalised?
 

Yes

No

(b)

been under a doctor's care regularly?
 

Yes

No

(c)

had a major illness or surgery (including wisdom tooth extraction)?
 

Yes

No

(d)

contracted or been in close contact with contagious infection, e.g. Chickenpox, measles, dengue, Chikungunya or any other viral infections?
 

Yes

No

8

Have you ever received / are taking:
 

Yes

No

(a)

Human Growth Hormone?
 

Yes

No

(b)

cornea / dura mater transplant?
 

Yes

No

(c)

insulin / diabetic medication?
 

Yes

No

9

In the past three (3) days, have you :
 

Yes

No

(a)

taken any medication (including pain killers)?
 

Yes

No

(b)

had a tooth extraction or dental work?
 

Yes

No

(c)

taken any form of traditional medicine (including herbal extract)?
 

Yes

No

10

Have you ever had:
 

Yes

No

(a)

heart trouble, chest pain, shortness of breath, persistent cough?
 

Yes

No

(b)

high blood pressure requiring medication?
 

Yes

No

(c)

Disease of the lungs, kidneys, liver or blood?
 

Yes

No

(d)

a diagnosis of any cancer?
 

Yes

No

(e)

any skin infection?
 

Yes

No

(f)

fainting, unconsciousness, fits or mental disorder?
 

Yes

No

(g)

Malaria, Babesiosis or Chagas Disease?
 

Yes

No

11

Have you received:
 

Yes

No

(a)

any injection or vaccination in the past twelve (12) months?
 

Yes

No

(b)

any Hepatitis vaccination before? If yes, when? ________________________
 

Yes

No

(c)

In the past eight weeks, have you received smallpox vaccination or have you had close physical contact with (eg, touch) the vaccination site of anyone who received small pox vaccination?
 

Yes

No

12(a)

Female Donors: Are you currently pregnant?
 

Yes

No

12(b)

Female Donors: Have you ever been pregnant in the past or had an abortion or a miscarriage previously? If so, please provide the number and last date of pregnancy _________________
 

Yes

No

13(a)

In the past twelve (12) months, have you travelled out of Singapore? If yes, where and when since your last successful donation?__________________
 

Yes

No

13(b)

Have you ever lived in a malaria endemic area consecutively for 6 months or more? If yes, where? __________________________
 

Yes

No

13(c)

Have you ever stayed in Mexico, South America or Central America for a continuous period of 4 weeks or more?
 

Yes

No

13(d)

Have you visited or lived cumulatively in Europe for five (5) years or more from 1980 to the present, or the United Kingdom (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Isle of Man & Channel Islands) for three (3) months or more from 1980 to 1996?
 

Yes

No

13(e)

Do you have any immediate family members who has been diagnosed with Creutzfeld-Jacob Disease (CJD)?
 

Yes

No

14

Do you understand that blood which is infected and donated to another person can cause disease, disability, pain, suffering and even death to him/her? Do you understand all the questions and information contained in this form and the donor information presented to you?
 

Yes

No

15

Do you know that If you feel that your blood should not be transfused to another person, you can call the 24-hour hotline at telephone No. 1800-2263320 (Toll-Free) to alert HSA immediately.
 

Yes

No

       
 

Question 1(a)
You should not donate blood if you think you may have the HIV infection (the virus that causes AIDS) or if you are at risk of HIV infection through high risk activities.

You should visit your family doctor, the polyclinic or the anonymous testing clinic for HIV testing if you feel you are at risk and not donate blood.
 

   
 

Question 1(b)
The ""window period"" for the HIV virus (virus that causes AIDS) ranges from several weeks to months depending on the individual and type of screening tests used. You should not donate blood if you have been exposed to the virus from high-risk sexual activity or if you have any other risk factors, because your blood may be infectious during this ""window period"" and we cannot detect the virus using the current tests.

To know more about risk factors, please read ""An Important Message to Blood Donors"" which can be found on this website under ""Publications"".
 

   
 

Question 1(c)
You should not donate blood if you think you may have been exposed to the HIV infection (the virus that causes AIDS) or if you are at risk of HIV infection through high risk activities.

You should visit your family doctor, the polyclinic or the anonymous testing clinic for HIV testing if you feel you are at risk and not donate blood.
 

   
 

Question 1(d)
This is considered very high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood after this since this is a major risk factor.

The word "sexual activity" means the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; whether or not a condom or other protection was used or "cunnilingus". For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question 2(a)
This is considered very high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood after this since this is a major risk factor.

The word "sexual activity" means the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; whether or not a condom or other protection was used or "cunnilingus". For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question 2(b)
This is considered high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood for at least 12 months following the last sexual contact with the above-mentioned male partner. If you are a regular donor, you may resume only after clearance by a screening interview at the end of 12 months.

The word "sexual activity" means the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; whether or not a condom or other protection was used or "cunnilingus". For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question 3(a)
The above symptom(s) may be due to HIV infection or some other serious illness. You should not donate blood. Please consult your doctor or visit the polyclinic for a thorough examination and testing to determine the cause.
 

   
 

Question 3(b)
You should not donate blood as this is one of the risk factors for HIV. For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question 4
You should not donate blood as this is one of the risk factors for HIV. For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question (a)
This is considered high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood for at least 12 months. If you are a regular donor, you may resume only after clearance by a screening at the end of 12 months.

The word "sexual activity" in this question applies to vaginal, oral or anal sex, whether or not a condom or other protection was used. For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question (b)
This is considered high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood for at least 12 months. If you are a regular donor, you may resume only after clearance by a screening at the end of 12 months.

The word "sexual activity" in this question applies to vaginal, oral or anal sex, whether or not a condom or other protection was used. For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question (c)
This is considered high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood for at least 12 months. If you are a regular donor, you may resume only after clearance by a screening at the end of 12 months.

The word "sexual activity" means the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; whether or not a condom or other protection was used or "cunnilingus". For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question (d)
If you have been diagnosed as having, or treated for, any sexually transmitted diseases other than syphilis, you may only donate blood after 12 months from the time of completion of treatment, provided you have not engaged in any high-risk sexual activities after treatment.

You should not donate blood if you have been previously diagnosed with syphilis or had a positive test for syphilis in the past.
 

   
 

Question (e)
This is considered high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood for at least 12 months. If you are a regular donor, you may resume only after clearance by a screening interview at the end of 12 months.

The word "sexual activity" means the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; whether or not a condom or other protection was used or "cunnilingus". For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question 5
This is considered high-risk sexual activity. You should not donate blood for at least 12 months. If you are a regular donor, you may resume only after clearance by a screening interview at the end of 12 months.

The word "sexual activity" means the introduction into the vagina, anus or mouth of any person of any part of the penis of another person; whether or not a condom or other protection was used or "cunnilingus". For more information please read "An Important Message to Blood Donors" which can be found on this website under "Publications".
 

   
 

Question (a)
If you have donated blood, platelets or plasma in the last 12 weeks, please ensure that the interval between your last donation and your current one is adequate.

We would advise an interval of 12 weeks between each whole blood donation, and an interval of at least 8 weeks when switching from a whole blood donation to an Apheresis Platelet of Plasma Donation. There should be a minimal 4 week interval between Apheresis Platelet or Plasma donations or when switching from Apheresis Platelet/Plasma donations to Whole Blood donation.

This minimal time interval is to protect the well being of donors. Blood donors require an adequate interval to rest and recover from each blood donation. This is to allow the body the necessary time to recover physically and replenish needed nutrients, as well as avoid overtaxing the bone marrow.


Kindly refer to the table below for the appropriate intervals between different types of donation.

Previous Donation Current Donation Interval Period
Whole Blood Whole Blood 12 weeks
Whole Blood Platelet/Plasmapheresis 8 weeks
Platelet/Plasmapheresis Whole Blood 4 weeks
Platelet/Plasmapheresis Platelet/Plasmapheresis 4 weeks


 

   
 

Question (b)
If you were told that you are permanently deferred from giving blood, then you must not donate blood.

If the deferral was temporary, you may donate blood after the deferral period is over. Each case will be evaluated and the suitability of the donors determined by the medical officer reviewing the case.
 

   
 

Question (c)
Hepatitis (or liver infection) can be transmitted through blood transfusion.

If you had a previous Hepatitis A infection you will be deferred for 1 year after recovery from the infection.

If you had a previous Hepatitis B or C infection you will be permanently deferred as the virus may persist in the blood and therefore can be transmitted to the blood recipients.

If you have a history of jaundice after birth or related to gallbladder problems, you may be accepted as a blood donor provided the condition has been treated.

If you previously had jaundice where the cause was unknown, you will be deferred from blood donation until the cause of the episode of jaundice can be established.

If you have a positive test for Hepatitis B or C infection, you must not donate blood and the results of the tests must be discussed with our doctors.

For more information please read ""An Important Message to Blood Donors"" which can be found on this website under ""Publications"".

You may also contact us by email if you need more information or clarification.
 

   
 

Question (d)
If you had close contact with a person with Hepatitis B or C you should not donate blood for a period of 12 months following the period of close contact.

""Close contact"" means living in the same household with a person with Hepatitis or coming into contact with the infected person's body fluids/secretions. This includes sexual contact.

If you are living with a relative who is a Hepatitis B carrier (same household) you are required to complete a course of Hepatitis B vaccination and produce documentary proof/record that your Hepatitis B immune status is adequate (sufficient level of antibody response), before making a blood donation.

If your spouse has chronic Hepatitis C infection you should not donate blood due to the potential for transmission of the infection.

If you are hospital staff in direct contact with patients with Hepatitis, you will be deferred for 12 months if you have experienced an inoculation injury or mucous membrane exposure. You may be accepted as a donor if you have been demonstrated to be immune.

For more information please read ""An Important Message to Blood Donors"" which can be found on this website under ""Publications"".
 

   
 

Question (e)
If you have received blood transfusion in the United Kingdom and France between 1980 and the present time, you should not donate blood. This is a precautionary measure to reduce the possible risk of transmission of vCJD or ""mad cow disease"" by blood and blood products.

If you have received plasma derivatives at any time since 1980 you must not donate blood and will be deferred indefinitely as a precautionary measure to prevent the possible risk of transmission of vCJD by blood and blood products.

Chagas disease is widely endemic throughout Central and South America, and Mexico, where the main mode of transmission is exposure to infected triatomine (or riduviid) bugs. Most infections are asymptomatic or cause non-specific, flu-like symptoms and are not diagnosed. Chagas disease can cause serious complications of the heart and gastrointestinal tract in approximately 30 per cent of infected individuals. Donors who were diagnosed to have Chaga's disease are deferred permanently. Since screening tests for donors are not available, donors with an identified risk of Chagas disease should be permanently deferred. Risk factors include:

1. Donors born in South America or Central America and Mexico
2. Mother was born in South America or Central America and Mexico
3. Received blood transfusion in South America or Central America and Mexico
4. Lived or worked in rural subsistence farming communities in South America or Central America and Mexico for a continuous period of four weeks or more

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (f)
If you have received blood or blood products (other than UK or France) you should not donate blood for a period of 12 months from the date of the transfusion as these may transmit some viral infections, although the risk is extremely small.
 

   
 

Question (g)
The above activity is considered as a risk factor for contracting AIDS and other viruses. Anyone engaging in such activity must not donate blood.
 

   
 

Question (h)
You are advised to stop blood donation for 12 months from the date of the ear piercing, tattoo, acupuncture, needle stick injury or exposure to blood contaminated instruments. However, ear piercing, tattoo and acupuncture are acceptable if performed under strictly sterile conditions using disposable needles. If there is any doubt of the sterility, you will be deferred for 12 months from donating blood.

Ear piercing, tattoo and acupuncture are acceptable if performed under strictly sterile technique using disposable needles. If unsure about the sterility of the technique used, donors are deferred for a period of twelve months from the date of the ear piercing, tattoo and acupuncture.
 

   
 

Question (i)
If you have been detained in any of the above within the past 12 months and the detention/imprisonment was for a period exceeding 24 hours, you should not donate blood for a period of 12 months from the date of release.
 

   
 

Question 6(a)
If you do not feel well on the day of donation you should not donate blood. It may be harmful to both you and the potential recipients if you have an infection or other illness.

If you only had common flu symptoms such as cough and cold without fever, you should not donate blood until one week after your condition has resolved.

If you had diarrhoea recently, you should not donate blood until one week after your condition has resolved.
 

   
 

Question 6(b)
If you had fever anytime in the last 3 weeks, please do not donate blood until 3 weeks after your condition has resolved. It may be harmful to both you and the potential recipients if you donate blood when you have an infection or other illness.
 

   
 

Question 7
If you had fever anytime in the last 3 weeks, please do not donate blood until 3 weeks after your condition has resolved. It may be harmful to both you and the potential recipients if you donate blood when you have an infection or other illness.
 

   
 

Question (a)
You should inform the medical officers at the blood bank of any illnesses that require regular follow up by your doctor as these medical conditions may lead to problems for the blood recipients and possibly your own condition if you donate blood.

In general, you are advised to stop blood donation for 12 months after major surgery and for 3-6 months after minor surgery.

If you have been infected with significant viral illnesses like chickenpox, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, measles or mumps you should stop blood donation for a period of six months following full recovery.

If you have been exposed to or have a history of close contact with these viral illnesses you should stop blood donation for a period of three weeks from the last contact. However, if you have had previous infection of chickenpox, measles or mumps with a history of close contact with these diseases you may be accepted for donation.

If you have been infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), you should stop blood donation for a period of three months following full recovery and cessation of therapy.

If you have a history of glandular fever or meningitis, you should not donate blood for twelve months following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Brucellosis or Toxoplasmosis, you should stop blood donation for a period of two years following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Chagas disease, Babesiosis, Leishmaniasis, HTLV-I/II or Chronic Q fever, you must not donate blood at all and will be deferred permanently.

You should not donate blood if you have a history of diseases that may be of autoimmune origin (including Graves Disease, ulcerative colitis and atrophic gastritis), even after full recovery (indefinite deferral).

If you have a history of contact with any infectious disease not mentioned above, you should not donate blood for a period not less than the incubation period (time taken for symptoms to appear after first exposure) of the disease.

If you are uncertain of your past illnesses and whether you can donate blood, you should contact your doctor and obtain a letter which provides details of your medical history.
 

   
 

Question (b)
You should inform the medical officers at the blood bank of any illnesses that require regular follow up by your doctor as these medical conditions may lead to problems for the blood recipients and possibly your own condition if you donate blood.

In general, you are advised to stop blood donation for 12 months after major surgery and for 3-6 months after minor surgery.

If you have been infected with significant viral illnesses like chickenpox, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, measles or mumps you should stop blood donation for a period of six months following full recovery.

If you have been exposed to or have a history of close contact with these viral illnesses you should stop blood donation for a period of three weeks from the last contact. However, if you have had previous infection of chickenpox, measles or mumps with a history of close contact with these diseases you may be accepted for donation.

If you have been infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), you should stop blood donation for a period of three months following full recovery and cessation of therapy.

If you have a history of glandular fever or meningitis, you should not donate blood for twelve months following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Brucellosis or Toxoplasmosis, you should stop blood donation for a period of two years following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Chagas disease, Babesiosis, Leishmaniasis, HTLV-I/II or Chronic Q fever, you must not donate blood at all and will be deferred permanently.

You should not donate blood if you have a history of diseases that may be of autoimmune origin (including Graves Disease, ulcerative colitis and atrophic gastritis), even after full recovery (indefinite deferral).

If you have a history of contact with any infectious disease not mentioned above, you should not donate blood for a period not less than the incubation period (time taken for symptoms to appear after first exposure) of the disease.

If you are uncertain of your past illnesses and whether you can donate blood, you should contact your doctor and obtain a letter which provides details of your medical history.
 

   
 

Question (c)
You should inform the medical officers at the blood bank of any illnesses that require regular follow up by your doctor as these medical conditions may lead to problems for the blood recipients and possibly your own condition if you donate blood.

In general, you are advised to stop blood donation for 12 months after major surgery and for 3-6 months after minor surgery.

If you have been infected with significant viral illnesses like chickenpox, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, measles or mumps you should stop blood donation for a period of six months following full recovery.

If you have been exposed to or have a history of close contact with these viral illnesses you should stop blood donation for a period of three weeks from the last contact. However, if you have had previous infection of chickenpox, measles or mumps with a history of close contact with these diseases you may be accepted for donation.

If you have been infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), you should stop blood donation for a period of three months following full recovery and cessation of therapy.

If you have a history of glandular fever or meningitis, you should not donate blood for twelve months following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Brucellosis or Toxoplasmosis, you should stop blood donation for a period of two years following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Chagas disease, Babesiosis, Leishmaniasis, HTLV-I/II or Chronic Q fever, you must not donate blood at all and will be deferred permanently.

You should not donate blood if you have a history of diseases that may be of autoimmune origin (including Graves Disease, ulcerative colitis and atrophic gastritis), even after full recovery (indefinite deferral).

If you have a history of contact with any infectious disease not mentioned above, you should not donate blood for a period not less than the incubation period (time taken for symptoms to appear after first exposure) of the disease.

If you are uncertain of your past illnesses and whether you can donate blood, you should contact your doctor and obtain a letter which provides details of your medical history.
 

   
 

Question (d)
You should inform the medical officers at the blood bank of any illnesses that require regular follow up by your doctor as these medical conditions may lead to problems for the blood recipients and possibly your own condition if you donate blood.

In general, you are advised to stop blood donation for 12 months after major surgery and for 3-6 months after minor surgery.

If you have been infected with significant viral illnesses like chickenpox, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, measles or mumps you should stop blood donation for a period of six months following full recovery.

If you have been exposed to or have a history of close contact with these viral illnesses you should stop blood donation for a period of three weeks from the last contact. However, if you have had previous infection of chickenpox, measles or mumps with a history of close contact with these diseases you may be accepted for donation.

If you have been infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), you should stop blood donation for a period of three months following full recovery and cessation of therapy.

If you have a history of glandular fever or meningitis, you should not donate blood for twelve months following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Brucellosis or Toxoplasmosis, you should stop blood donation for a period of two years following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Chagas disease, Babesiosis, Leishmaniasis, HTLV-I/II or Chronic Q fever, you must not donate blood at all and will be deferred permanently.

If you have a history of diseases that may be of autoimmune origin, including Graves Disease, ulcerative colitis and atrophic gastritis, you will be deferred indefinitely and should not donate blood.

If you have a history of contact with any infectious disease not mentioned above, you should not donate blood for a period not less than the incubation period (time taken for symptoms to appear after first exposure) of the disease.

If you are uncertain of your past illnesses and whether you can donate blood, you should contact your doctor and obtain a letter which provides details of your medical history.
 

   
 

Question 8
You should inform the medical officers at the blood bank of any illnesses that require regular follow up by your doctor as these medical conditions may lead to problems for the blood recipients and possibly your own condition if you donate blood.

In general, you are advised to stop blood donation for 12 months after major surgery and for 3-6 months after minor surgery.

If you have been infected with significant viral illnesses like chickenpox, dengue fever, chikungunya fever, measles or mumps you should stop blood donation for a period of six months following full recovery.

If you have been exposed to or have a history of close contact with these viral illnesses you should stop blood donation for a period of three weeks from the last contact. However, if you have had previous infection of chickenpox, measles or mumps with a history of close contact with these diseases you may be accepted for donation.

If you have been infected with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), you should stop blood donation for a period of three months following full recovery and cessation of therapy.

If you have a history of glandular fever or meningitis, you should not donate blood for twelve months following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Brucellosis or Toxoplasmosis, you should stop blood donation for a period of two years following full recovery.

If you have been infected with Chagas disease, Babesiosis, Leishmaniasis, HTLV-I/II or Chronic Q fever, you must not donate blood at all and will be deferred permanently.

If you have a history of diseases that may be of autoimmune origin, including Graves Disease, ulcerative colitis and atrophic gastritis, you will be deferred indefinitely and should not donate blood.

If you have a history of contact with any infectious disease not mentioned above, you should not donate blood for a period not less than the incubation period (time taken for symptoms to appear after first exposure) of the disease.

If you are uncertain of your past illnesses and whether you can donate blood, you should contact your doctor and obtain a letter which provides details of your medical history.
 

   
 

Question (a)
You must not donate blood, as this is a risk factor for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), which is a rare neuro-degenerative disorder that is potentially transmissible through blood transfusion.

However, if the growth hormone you have received/are taking is fully synthetic or recombinant, you may be accepted for blood donation.
 

   
 

Question (b)
You must not donate blood, as these are risk factors for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), which is a rare neuro-degenerative disorder that is potentially transmissible through blood transfusion.
 

   
 

Question (c)
You must not donate blood. If you have ever received bovine insulin (insulin extracted from the cow). You must not donate blood, even if you have stopped taking bovine insulin as this is a risk factor for the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD or Mad Cow Disease).
 

   
 

Question 9
You must not donate blood. If you have ever received bovine insulin (insulin extracted from the cow). You must not donate blood, even if you have stopped taking bovine insulin as this is a risk factor for the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD or Mad Cow Disease).
 

   
 

Question (a)
Deferral of blood donation is generally based on the nature of the disease being treated by the drug rather than the drug itself. You are advised to wait for at least 3 days after taking any medication. However, for the more common medications like Panadol, you may be accepted for blood donation provided you are well at the time of donation.

There are certain drugs for which deferral of blood donation is necessary for longer periods. Please speak to any of our medical staff for clarification of any doubts or if you are taking special medication.
 

   
 

Question (b)
If you had dental scaling or dental extraction you should not donate blood for 24 hours and 72 hours respectively after the procedure. If you had wisdom tooth surgical extraction you will be deferred for 3 months after the procedure. The deferral is necessary to reduce the incidence of bacterial contamination in the blood collected.
 

   
 

Question (c)
You should stop taking the traditional medication for at least three days before donating blood. Acceptable medications are herbs that are brewed, ginseng linghzi etc.

Please speak to any of our medical staff for clarification of any doubts or if you are taking traditional medicines.
 

   
 

Question 10
You should stop taking the traditional medication for at least three days before donating blood. Acceptable medications are herbs that are brewed, ginseng linghzi etc.

Please speak to any of our medical staff for clarification of any doubts or if you are taking traditional medicines.
 

   
 

Question (a)
In general, if you have a past history of angina, acute myocardial infarction (heart attack) or ischaemic heart disease you should not donate blood to avoid precipitating any heart problems during or after the blood donation procedures.

If you have a moderate to severe heart valve problem or significant arrhythmia (abnormal heart rhythm) you will be deferred permanently from any blood donation.

If you have non-specific symptoms like shortness of breath, cough or chest pain you will be assessed individually and may be deferred from blood donation.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (b)
You will be deferred from blood donation if you are using non-diuretic medication to control your high blood pressure. You may donate blood if you do not require medication for blood pressure control or if using only a diuretic medication and your blood pressure is within the acceptable range on the day of blood donation.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (c)
Generally, if you have any severe or chronic disease of these organs, you should not donate blood. If you have fully recovered, or suffer from milder forms of disease, you will need to be assessed for suitability to donate blood. This assessment will take into account the nature and the severity of the illness, and the treatment that you may be taking.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (d)
If you have a history of cancer, even if in remission, you should not donate blood.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (e)
If you have severe, active and generalised skin diseases (such as psoriasis) you should not donate blood. Donors with only mild skin diseases can be accepted.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (f)
If you have epilepsy which requires treatment, you should not donate blood. However, if you only have a history of childhood febrile convulsions (fits caused by high fever in childhood) you may be accepted as a blood donor.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (g)
All new or 1st time donors in Singapore with a history of malaria infection will be permanently deferred.

Repeat donors who had a past history of malaria infection but had donated blood in Singapore since their infection may still continue to donate blood.

A repeat donor diagnosed to have malaria before and experienced a relapse is deferred permanently.

Babesiosis is caused by a tiny parasite called Babesia microti,that infects red blood cells. The parasite is spread from animals to humans via a bite from a tick and is usually found is the USA as well as in other parts of the world like Australia, Egypt, Europe, Japan, Korea, Mexico, North/South America, South Africa and Taiwan. Most people infected with Babesiosis do not feel sick, and do not even remember being bitten by a tick. However, Babesiosis can be a severe, life-threatening infection in the hospitalized patients who are blood recipients. Donors who were diagnosed to have Babesiosis are deferred permanently.

Chagas disease is widely endemic throughout Central and South America, and Mexico, where the main mode of transmission is exposure to infected triatomine (or riduviid) bugs. Most infections are asymptomatic or cause non-specific, flu-like symptoms and are not diagnosed. Chagas disease can cause serious complications of the heart and gastrointestinal tract in approximately 30 per cent of infected individuals. Donors who were diagnosed to have Chaga's disease are deferred permanently. Since screening tests for donors are not available, donors with an identified risk of Chagas disease should be permanently deferred. Risk factors include:

1. Donors born in South America or Central America and Mexico
2. Mother was born in South America or Central America and Mexico
3. Received blood transfusion in South America or Central America and Mexico
4. Lived or worked in rural subsistence farming communities in South America or Central America and Mexico for a continuous period of four weeks or more

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question 11
All new or 1st time donors in Singapore with a history of malaria infection will be permanently deferred.

Repeat donors who had a past history of malaria infection but had donated blood in Singapore since their infection may still continue to donate blood.

A repeat donor diagnosed to have malaria before and experienced a relapse is deferred permanently.

Babesiosis is caused by a tiny parasite called Babesia microti,that infects red blood cells. The parasite is spread from animals to humans via a bite from a tick and is usually found is the USA as well as in other parts of the world like Australia, Egypt, Europe, Japan, Korea, Mexico, North/South America, South Africa and Taiwan. Most people infected with Babesiosis do not feel sick, and do not even remember being bitten by a tick. However, Babesiosis can be a severe, life-threatening infection in the hospitalized patients who are blood recipients. Donors who were diagnosed to have Babesiosis are deferred permanently.

Chagas disease is widely endemic throughout Central and South America, and Mexico, where the main mode of transmission is exposure to infected triatomine (or riduviid) bugs. Most infections are asymptomatic or cause non-specific, flu-like symptoms and are not diagnosed. Chagas disease can cause serious complications of the heart and gastrointestinal tract in approximately 30 per cent of infected individuals. Donors who were diagnosed to have Chaga's disease are deferred permanently. Since screening tests for donors are not available, donors with an identified risk of Chagas disease should be permanently deferred. Risk factors include:

1. Donors born in South America or Central America and Mexico
2. Mother was born in South America or Central America and Mexico
3. Received blood transfusion in South America or Central America and Mexico
4. Lived or worked in rural subsistence farming communities in South America or Central America and Mexico for a continuous period of four weeks or more

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (a)
There are different deferral periods depending on the type of vaccination and the reason it was given. The deferral periods range from 48 hours to 12 months after the vaccination. For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question (b)
You may donate blood 48 hours after the vaccination if you have no symptoms.
 

   
 

Question (c)
There are different deferral periods, depending on the condition of the small pox vaccination site and whether there any post-vaccination complications. Please contact our medical officer at Tel: 62130626 for more information/advice.

For those recently exposed to another person's small pox vaccination site, the period of deferral would depend on whether there are any post-exposure complications present.

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question 12(a)
You are advised not to donate blood during pregnancy or within six weeks after the delivery or abortion. If the delivery was by Caeserean Section, please wait for 6 months from the operation before donating blood.

If you are still breastfeeding, you should not donate blood as this may reduce your iron stores and affect your baby's iron intake from the breast milk.

Donors who are still breastfeeding their infant should only donate after she has stopped breast-feeding.
 

   
 

Question 12(b)
You are advised not to donate blood during pregnancy or within six weeks after the delivery or abortion. If the delivery was by Caeserean Section, please wait for 6 months from the operation before donating blood.

If you are still breastfeeding, you should not donate blood as this may reduce your iron stores and affect your baby's iron intake from the breast milk.

Donors who are still breastfeeding their infant should only donate after she has stopped breast-feeding.
 

   
 

Question 13(a)
Donors without any history of stay for least 6 consecutive months (in their lifetime) in a malaria endemic area but have travelled and returned from a malaria endemic area less than four (4) months from the day of screening will be asked to come back at least four (4) months later.

Donors without any history of stay for least 6 consecutive months (in their lifetime) in a malaria endemic area but have travelled and returned from a malaria endemic area twelve (12) months or more from the day of screening will be accepted for normal donation.

Donors who previously lived or stayed for at least 6 consecutive months (in their lifetime) in a malaria endemic area and returned from a malaria endemic area less than four (4) months from the day of screening will be deferred and asked to come back at least 4 months after their return.
 

   
 

Question 13(b)
Donors who previously lived or stayed for at least 6 consecutive months (in their lifetime) in a malaria endemic area and returned from a malaria endemic area less than four (4) months from the day of screening will be deferred and asked to come back at least 4 months after their return.
 

   
 

Question 13(c)
Chagas disease is widely endemic throughout Central and South America, and Mexico, where the main mode of transmission is exposure to infected triatomine (or riduviid) bugs. Most infections are asymptomatic or cause non-specific, flu-like symptoms and are not diagnosed. Chagas disease can cause serious complications of the heart and gastrointestinal tract in approximately 30 per cent of infected individuals. Donors who were diagnosed to have Chaga's disease are deferred permanently. Since screening tests for donors are not available, donors with an identified risk of Chagas disease should be permanently deferred. Risk factors include:

1. Donors born in South America or Central America and Mexico
2. Mother was born in South America or Central America and Mexico
3. Received blood transfusion in South America or Central America and Mexico
4. Lived or worked in rural subsistence farming communities in South America or Central America and Mexico for a continuous period of four weeks or more

For more information regarding this matter, please speak to our medical staff.
 

   
 

Question 13(d)
A number of transfusion-associated variant Creutzfeld-Jakob Disease (vCJD) have been identified in the UK, suggesting that this disease can be transmitted through blood transfusion. In the absence of a reliable screening test for the blood supply, the blood service in Singapore has adopted precautionary measures to reduce the risk of transmission by deferring blood donors with a history of travel or residence in areas where the vCJD agent might have been present in meat products and by-products. This includes those who have spent a cumulative 3 months in the UK between 1980 and 1996, a cumulative 5 years in France from 1980 to present, or received a blood transfusion in the UK from 1980 to present.

This restriction is an international precautionary measure enforced by all blood banks of developed countries. There is no intention to discriminate against potential donors from any particular country of residence. These restrictions are solely to protect the interest of blood recipients in Singapore.

Donors who have spent three months or more cumulatively in the United Kingdom from 1980 through 1996 (i.e. from 1 January 1980 through 31 December 1996) will be permanently deferred from any type of blood donation. Donors who have spent five years or more cumulatively in France from 1980 to the present will be permanently deferred from any type of blood donation.

Donors who have lived cumulatively for 5 years or more in Europe (excluding France and UK) from 1980 to the present will be permanently deferred for whole blood donation but they can donate plasma by plasmapheresis only (Provided wt >50 kg and Haemoglobin >12.5 g/dl).
 

   
 

Question 13(e)
If you have immediate blood relatives (first order relatives: parents, siblings and offspring) with CJD, you will be deferred indefinitely from donating blood.
 

   
 

Question 14
All donors should read through "An Important Message to Blood Donors" and clarify any queries or doubts before they donate blood. All donors are required to answer every question truthfully. Any answer, which is false or misleading, would render them liable to prosecution for supplying false information under the Infectious Diseases Act.
 

   
 

Question 15
All donors have the option of Calling Back to the Blood Bank to stop their donated blood from being transfused.

No reasons need to be provided by the donor.

Donors need only identify themselves and provide the date of their recent blood donation.